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The Middlesex Community College “One World” series will host Glenn Kumekawa, a leading public-planning expert and veteran of a World War II relocation camp for Japanese-Americans, on Oct. 11 at 10:30 a.m. in the Bedford Campus Center Café East, 591 Springs Road.

Free and open to the public, the program is offered in conjunction with MCC’s 2007-08 common book, When The Emperor Was Devine, by Julie Otsuka. Her acclaimed first novel is the fictionalized account of how one West Coast Japanese-American family is affected by the events of World War II.

Kumekawa was 14 when he and his family were given two weeks to leave their San Francisco home. Their detention began in the months after the U.S. entered the war, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1942 executive order allowing the forcible detention of Japanese-Americans. For three years, the Kumekawas lived behind barbed wire, under armed guard at Camp Topaz — the fictional camp in Otsuka’s novel — in the Utah desert.

Profoundly affected by the internment experience, Kumekawa was also influenced by the efforts of Americans of conscience who worked to free Japanese-Americans from the camps. At Middlesex, he will talk about his personal experiences and the parallels he sees between racial attitudes in the U.S. after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and current attitudes after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Now a leading public-planning expert, Kumekawa is professor emeritus at the University of Rhode Island, where he was director of the Intergovernmental Policy Analysis program. He is also president of the Nisei Student Relocation Commemorative Fund, a scholarship program for U.S. students from Southeast Asian immigrant families.

MCC’s common book is selected for literary quality and relevance to many subject areas by the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Committee. The series at Middlesex is an annual speaker series addressing topics of current interest.

For more information, contact Tom Laughlin, chair of MCC’s Writing Across the Curriculum Committee, at 781-280-3839.

Learn more about Middlesex Community College’s nationally recognized Transition Program, a two-year, noncredit certificate program for students with learning/cognitive disabilities. This specialized program is designed for students without the skills necessary to complete requirements for an associate degree.

Transition Program students attend classes designed to teach independent-living skills, computer and job-survival skills, and social skills. They will also be placed in an internship program.

A public-information session for prospective students and their families will be held on Oct. 18 from 9 to 11 a.m. in MCC’s Bedford Campus Center, Café East, 591 Springs Road.

Participants will receive an overview of the program, as well as in-depth information on the curriculum, application procedures, details of the required internship portion of the program and prospective job opportunities.

Candidates should have a high-school diploma or GED credential, interest in training for entry-level work in business and industry, fifth- to eighth-grade level reading and math skills, and the maturity and emotional stability to effectively participate in a program on a college campus.

To register, call 781-280-3630. For more information, contact Kathy Matheson, Disability Support Services, at 781-280-3525.

Middlesex Community College will host an open house on its Lowell Campus on Oct. 13 from 9:30 a.m. to noon in the City Building, 33 Kearney Square.

Learn about MCC’s 76 degree and certificate program options, as well as financial aid, academic counseling, tutoring, career counseling, disability support and other special programs.

Hear about the many transfer options available to four-year colleges and universities. Learn how to get funding for your education, meet division deans, faculty and staff, see hands-on demonstrations, take a tour of the campus and apply to the college. A complimentary continental breakfast will be offered.

To reserve a spot or for more information, call 1-800-818-3434 or visit us online at www.middlesex.mass.edu/OH.