DRACUT — The town is a step closer to highly anticipated affordable senior housing.

Town Manager Jim Duggan recently announced that Common Ground Development Corp. was chosen for the development of up to 60 units on a parcel of land at 144 Greenmont Ave. Five proposals were previously reviewed by Duggan, Housing Authority Executive Director Mary Karabatsos and Meredith Boumil-Flynn, who is listed on the town website as the vice chairman of the Capital Planning Committee.

CGDC was created as a nonprofit subsidiary of Community Teamwork Inc. to produce more housing for home buyers and tenants, and to preserve existing apartments at affordable rent levels, according to its website.

"Ultimately, we were very pleased with the responses that we received from different proposals," Duggan said. "They were all strong, they were all good, but what stood out for us was the level of familiarity with the project and the inclusion of (Common Ground Development's) services from CTI and Mill City Grows, which I think is important for the success of the project to engage as much services throughout Greater Lowell."

The project will use $3 million from Community Preservation Act funds. Duggan said the Community Preservation Committee reaffirmed their support in recent months.

The town owns the land where the senior housing is poised to be developed, and there are plans for a land lease of about 60 years. Duggan said his administration is working with town counsel on the lease details.


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"It's my intent to have a long-term commitment for the development of senior affordable housing, and I know that any subsidies that would be coming from the state would want to see that long-term commitment by everybody," Duggan said late last week.

Karabatsos said Common Ground Development's inclusion of other services, as well as consideration of the abutters in the area, is the "type of environment that Dracut is looking for."

She added that there should be some people on the Housing Authority's waitlist that would qualify for housing.

"In my estimation, Common Ground is best suited for this project," Karabatsos said. "They're well-experienced in building affordable housing."

The estimated total cost of the project is about $18,850,00, according to Steven Joncas, director of real-estate development for Common Ground Development.

"Dracut, to their credit, has made a very strong commitment to producing funding for the development of affordable senior rental housing in their community. ... We're really thrilled to have been selected," Joncas said. "I think one of the strengths that we bring is the relationship that we have with Community Teamwork because we know that our senior population becomes more dependent upon services, and CTI obviously has a whole range of services that they provide forseniors and others who are in need of affordable housing."

The competition for funding is fierce, said both Joncas and Karen Frederick, CEO of Community Teamwork. Frederick said it takes time.

According to Joncas, some of the funding sources Common Ground would be seeking include the state's Department of Housing and Community Development, as well as the Affordable Housing Trust Fund.

It's too early to determine when building will begin.

"We are also thrilled as the parent organization because it allows us to bring more of our services to Dracut," Frederick said. "As a Dracut resident, I am really happy because I know the history of the need for senior housing."

DRACUT — The town is a step closer to highly anticipated affordable senior housing.

Town Manager Jim Duggan recently announced that Common Ground Development Corp. was chosen for the development of up to 60 units on a parcel of land at 144 Greenmont Ave. Five proposals were previously reviewed by Duggan, Housing Authority Executive Director Mary Karabatsos and Meredith Boumil-Flynn, who is listed on the town website as the vice chairman of the Capital Planning Committee.

CGDC was created as a nonprofit subsidiary of Community Teamwork Inc. to produce more housing for home buyers and tenants, and to preserve existing apartments at affordable rent levels, according to its website.

"Ultimately, we were very pleased with the responses that we received from different proposals," Duggan said. "They were all strong, they were all good, but what stood out for us was the level of familiarity with the project and the inclusion of (Common Ground Development's) services from CTI and Mill City Grows, which I think is important for the success of the project to engage as much services throughout Greater Lowell."

The project will use $3 million from Community Preservation Act funds. Duggan said the Community Preservation Committee reaffirmed their support in recent months.

The town owns the land where the senior housing is poised to be developed, and there are plans for a land lease of about 60 years. Duggan said his administration is working with town counsel on the lease details.

"It's my intent to have a long-term commitment for the development of senior affordable housing, and I know that any subsidies that would be coming from the state would want to see that long-term commitment by everybody," Duggan said late last week.

Karabatsos said Common Ground Development's inclusion of other services, as well as consideration of the abutters in the area, is the "type of environment that Dracut is looking for."

She added that there should be some people on the Housing Authority's waitlist that would qualify for housing.

"In my estimation, Common Ground is best suited for this project," Karabatsos said. "They're well-experienced in building affordable housing."

The estimated total cost of the project is about $18,850,00, according to Steven Joncas, director of real-estate development for Common Ground Development.

"Dracut, to their credit, has made a very strong commitment to producing funding for the development of affordable senior rental housing in their community. ... We're really thrilled to have been selected," Joncas said. "I think one of the strengths that we bring is the relationship that we have with Community Teamwork because we know that our senior population becomes more dependent upon services, and CTI obviously has a whole range of services that they provide forseniors and others who are in need of affordable housing."

The competition for funding is fierce, said both Joncas and Karen Frederick, CEO of Community Teamwork. Frederick said it takes time.

According to Joncas, some of the funding sources Common Ground would be seeking include the state's Department of Housing and Community Development, as well as the Affordable Housing Trust Fund.

It's too early to determine when building will begin.

"We are also thrilled as the parent organization because it allows us to bring more of our services to Dracut," Frederick said. "As a Dracut resident, I am really happy because I know the history of the need for senior housing."