DRACUT -- It was a very bumpy road last week for motorists driving through the intersection of Broadway Road and Loon Hill in Dracut. Due to paving, they were sent on detours which caused traffic issues and had several people airing their frustrations out on social media.

The paving on the roads are finally completed, Town Manager Jim Duggan said last week, but there are still some finishing touches left to be tackled. The overall project is the result of a $2.5 million MassWorks grant the town received from the state.

During last Tuesday's Board of Selectmen meeting, Duggan said that the remaining work includes laying down all the lines, painting the turning lanes and, soon thereafter, the traffic lights.

"The lights at the intersections will be activated and then in 30 days from there -- after they've been activated -- they will make any adjustments appropriately that need to be done in order for traffic flow," Duggan said.

Duggan said people and businesses in the area have been great and extremely patient with the changes.

"I'm sure there is levels of aggravation out there, but progress sometimes is ugly," Duggan said recently to The Sun.

Motorists aside, the work in recent weeks has disrupted not only traffic flow but businesses in the area.

"It's not a pleasant thing, but we're very fortunate that our customers are still finding their way to us," said Lyndie Shaw, owner of M.L. Shaw's at 14 Loon Hill Rd.


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, Dracut, in the Loon Hill Plaza. "We've been slightly affected, but I think there are other businesses in the plaza that have been severely affected."

Shaw stressed that, though the road improvement work has been a little bit of an inconvenience, it has not affected her business catastrophically.

"We're doing okay," she said.

Last month, Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito paid a visit to Dracut to see firsthand the improvements underway at the Broadway Rd.-Loon Hill Rd. intersection and lauded the town for its economic development -- which has been a key priority placed on Duggan when he was hired by the town three years ago.

"Here in Dracut, they clearly have a vision and they have plans around how to build out this community in terms of great schools, creating more jobs and opportunities for people, and then creating housing for people to be able to stay here, afford to live here, and be part of a community that they have ties to," Polito told The Sun during her visit. "And so Dracut stands out as a model in terms of both leadership and the ability to get the work done that they know will benefit the community for many years to come."

Follow Amaris Castillo on Twitter @AmarisCastillo.