Steve Grossman, left, the state treasurer and Democratic candidate for governor, toured UTEC Tuesday. At right is UTEC Executive Director Gregg Croteau.
Steve Grossman, left, the state treasurer and Democratic candidate for governor, toured UTEC Tuesday. At right is UTEC Executive Director Gregg Croteau. SUN/Lyle Moran

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LOWELL -- State Treasurer Steve Grossman said Tuesday he had no involvement with his mother's decision to contribute to a Super-PAC supporting his candidacy for governor.

Grossman said he was unaware of his 92-year-old mother was one of the top donors to the Mass Forward political action committee until the names of donors were made public Monday as required by a new state law.

"She doesn't consult with me most of the time when she does anything," Grossman said.

"She certainly had no conversations with me about this. Yesterday was the first and only conversation she and I ever had about this subject, but I'm proud to have her support."

After the names of the top contributors to the pro-Grossman Super-PAC were released Monday, Grossman said he called Shirley Grossman Monday afternoon.

"I said, "Mom, is that you? Did you contribute to this?'" Grossman said. "She said, 'That's me.' I said, well, mom, that is the first and only conversation you and I are going to have about this subject."

Candidates and Super-PACs cannot coordinate their efforts.

Grossman's mother on Monday told the Boston Globe that there had been no conversations between herself and her son about her donation.

Steve Grossman said he would have no issue with the state Office of Campaign and Political Finance investigating the issue.

"They have always seen me as someone who played it by the book and played by the rules," said Grossman, highlighting he has run for statewide office three times in the last 15 years. "I've done that.


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I'm doing it now. I will continue to do that."

Shirley Grossman's name now shows up at the bottom of a Mass Forward commercial called "Mothers," which depicts four mothers who lost their sons to gun violence.

The advertisement takes aim at one of Grossman's rivals for the Democratic gubernatorial nominee for governor, Attorney General Martha Coakley.

The ad criticizes Coakley for not supporting Gov. Deval Patrick's proposal to limit gun purchases in Massachusetts to one per person per month.

Later Tuesday, Grossman became the third candidate for governor to visit the United Teen Equality Center. Previously, Coakley and independent candidate Evan Falchuk visited.

Follow Moran on Twitter @lylemoran

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